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Protecting Business Online

How To Read And Interpret @watch Performance Reports

How To Read The Report
Availability Report
User Experience Report
How To Interpret The Alert Data
When Are Alerts Sent?
Account Data


How To Read The Report:

    @watch performance reports are sent daily, weekly, and monthly. @watch Lite and @watch Pro customers receive a Site Availability report. @watch Enterprise customers receive a report consisting of both Site Availability and User Experience.

    At the top of the Performance report are information about the URL for the report as well as the date that the report covers. There are three report periods: daily, weekly, and monthly. The date range on the report will correspond to the proper report period.


Availability Report:

Availability and Alert Chart:

Title Bar Shows the URL for this chart.
Alert Condition Section This narrow strip-chart shows where alerts conditions were detected. The red alert mark will appear over its performance measurement.
Response Time Section Availability data is shown by vertical bars. The X axis is time of day for the report period and the Y axis is the measured performance of the DNS lookup and partial page retrieval in milliseconds.

Each bar in the chart represents @watch watching your site. The color of each bar in the chart indicates the results of that watch.

Green Good DNS Lookup: We successfully performed the DNS lookup.
Cyan Good Page (1k) Lookup: We were successfully able to retrieve the first 1k of the web page.
Yellow Error DNS Lookup: We could not perform DNS Lookup.
Magenta Error Page (1k) Lookup: We could not retrieve the first 1k of the web page.
Red An alert condition was detected.

Availability Statistics:

The availability statistics section of your report contains information about the performance of your site over the report period. It gives the low, average, and high numbers for three statistics:

  • DNS Lookup Time: The time it took to resolve your DNS name into an IP address.
  • Page (1K) Retrieval Time: The time it took to download the first 1024 bytes of your web page.
  • Combined Time: The total of the DNS Lookup Time and the Page (1K) Retrieval Time.

The last statistic given is the Percentage Up Time. This number represents the percentage of total watches that @watch could not retrieve your web page.


User Experience Report:

User Experience and Alert Chart:

Title Bar Shows the URL for this chart.
Alert Condition Section This narrow strip-chart shows where alerts conditions were detected. The red alert mark will appear over its performance measurement.
Response Time Section Availability data is shown by vertical bars. The X axis is time of day for the report period and the Y axis is the measured performance of the DNS lookup and partial page retrieval in milliseconds.

Each bar in the chart represents @watch watching your site. The color of each bar in the chart indicates the results of that watch.

Green Good Response (Single Try): We were able to successfully retrieve the page, all its frames, and all its images on the first try.
Yellow Warning (Multiple Tries): We were able to successfully retrieve the page, all its frames, and all its images. Part of the page required more than one attempt.
Orange Warning (Slow Response): We were able to successfully retrieve the page, all its frames, and all its images, but it took a long time to do it.
Magenta Error Page (Timed Out): We were not able to retrieve the page, all its frames, and all its images because it was taking too long.
Red An alert condition was detected.

User Experience Statistics

This section of the report lists the low, average, and high retrieval times for your web page over the course of the report period. The values include the time required to download your web page, all frames, and all images.



How To Interpret The Alert Table:

The Alert Table consists of six columns:

Date & Time The date and time that the alert condition was detected. It is recorded based on the timezone chosen during setup.
Alert Condition (Count) The category of the alert condition, followed by the number of alerts.
Alert Detail Contains detail about the alert condition.
Alerts Sent (Escalated) These columns indicate if alerts are enabled and/or sent out. If you have enabled the particular alert type, the color of the column will be red. If not, the color of the column will be gray. If a "standard" alert has been sent out, the column will contain the word "Yes". If an "escalated" alert has been sent out, the word "Yes" will appear in parenthesis under the "standard" alert, otherwise the word "No" will appear.
Email Contains email alert information.
Pager Contains pager alert information.
Fax Contains fax alert information.

Alert Condition:

The Alert Condition column gives the type of alert. There are three types of @watch alerts:

NON CRITICAL A non-critical alert is an alert that does not affect the availability of your site. It may be slow response, too many attempts to download page, or missing images. Non-critical alerts generally indicate a problem that should be checked, but the web server is still running.
CRITICAL A critical alert condition is an alert that affects the availability of your site. It may be one of several alerts listed in the Alert Details column.
RECOVERY A recovery alert indicates that the previous alert condition has been resolved.

When @watch detects an alert condition for the first time we do not send an alert until we have confirmed it by watching the site again. This is done to avoid sending false "nuisance" alerts. We do list the initial alert conditions in the Alert Table, even though an alert may not have been sent. Each type of alert will be one of the following two states:

Verifying We have detected the initial alert condition, but we have not verified it.
CONFIRMED We have verified the alert condition and have sent an alert.

The Alert Condition is followed by a number in parenthesis. This is the number of alerts conditions that have been detected for this alert. For instance, when we first detect a non-critical alert, we report NON CRITICIAL-Verifying (1), and when it is confirmed, we report NON CRITICIAL-CONFIRMED (2).

Alert Detail:

The Alert Detail column contains a description of the alert sent. The description can be one of the following:

DNS Not Avail Indicates that we were unable to resolve the DNS name for this URL.
Server Not Avail Indicates that the server should have been there, but did not respond. Possible reasons for this are:
  1. Server down, malfunctioning, too busy to respond, or refusing connections
  2. Data line down, malfunctioning, or overloaded
  3. ISP down, malfunctioning, or overloaded
  4. General Internet problems, routes down, or major ISP/NSP problems
  5. Routing or Firewall problem
Server Error Indicates that an error occurred while retrieving the web page. This is usually a transport error, such as an error in the underlying TCP/IP protocol.
Invalid URL Indicates that the requested URL has an invalid format or the web server could not interpret the request which can be caused by typing errors or the URL page was present but inaccessible.
URL Not Avail Indicates that the requested URL is not found on the web server. This is equivalent to a "404 File Not Found" error.
Page Time Out The time it took to download the web page exceeded our timeout value. Possible reasons for this can be:
  1. Server malfunctioning, very busy, or overloaded
  2. Data line malfunctioning or overloaded
  3. ISP malfunctioning or overloaded
  4. General Internet problems, routes slow, or major ISP/NSP performance problems
Site Time Out The time it took to download the web page, its frames, and its images exceeded our timeout value. Possible reasons for this can be:
  1. Server malfunctioning, very busy, or overloaded
  2. Data line malfunctioning or overloaded
  3. ISP malfunctioning or overloaded
  4. General Internet problems, routes slow, or major ISP/NSP performance problems
Too Many Redirections The web server has returned too many redirections. We limit the amount of web server redirections we follow to 10 to prevent getting stuck in a redirection "loop".
Hacker Alert Indicates that the web page has changed since the last site snapshot. You should manually check the web page to find out why it has changed.
Text Check Alert Indicates that a specific text string that should have been contained on the first 1024 bytes of the web page is missing. You should manually check the page to find out why it has changed.
Missing Frames Indicates that there were missing frames on the web page. Refer to the alert message that you received for details.
Missing Images Indicates that there were missing images on the web page. This can be either images within your control, or images/banners from service companies which are generally outside your control. Refer to the alert message that you received for details.
Slow Response Indicates that the web server is responding very slowly and exceeded the "slow response" limit when returning the web page. Possible reasons for this can be:
  1. Server malfunctioning, very busy, or overloaded
  2. Data line malfunctioning or overloaded
  3. ISP malfunctioning or overloaded
  4. General Internet problems, routes slow, or major ISP/NSP performance problems
(unknown) This rare problem (generally) only happens during periods of severe instability of the Internet and indicates that some unknown error has happened when trying to retrieve the web page. It is difficult to determine what has happened at this point, but there may be more information contained in the actual alert that was sent out. If this problem persists, please contact @watch support to try to determine the cause.


When Are Alerts Sent?

    Alerts are first confirmed and then are sent according to a formula designed to eliminate false "nuisance" alerts.

    For example, the first time a problem is detected it is called a "CRITICAL-Verifying (1)" or "NON CRITICAL-Verifying (1)". Then, if the problem persists, an alert is sent out by the alert method you have chosen. Every single alert is not sent out, however. (This could release a barrage of alerts, especially if the watch frequency was five minutes.) To avoid this, a formula is used. At present, after sending out the first alert, the server will send only the 2nd, 4th, 8th, 16th, etc. alert. This progression continues until a 24-hour period is reached. If the problem is still present after 24 hours, only a single alert is sent out each day. After a certain number of days, our operations personnel are notified in order to investigate the cause of the prolonged alert condition.

    If you know that your web server will be down for a prolonged period of time, we request that you go to our web site, log in to Member Services, and "suspend" alerts during that time. This helps avoid false alerts and provides a better service for everyone.


Account Data:

    Toward the bottom of the report is the Account Information section. This displays important @watch account and site information. Click on the "Update" link to easily log in to Member Services and review or change your account information.